Member News

News and updates from BOMA Edmonton members.

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
June 2024

BOMA Edmonton

Mentions

Posts and Publications

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
May 2024

BOMA Edmonton

Mentions

Posts and Publications

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
April 2024

BOMA Edmonton

Mentions

Posts and Publications

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
March 2024

BOMA Edmonton

Mentions

  • The 2024 provincial budget commitments to Edmonton include money for police, infrastructure, post-secondary education, and health. The budget would fund 100 new street-level police in Edmonton and Calgary, fighting gun and gang violence, upgrading correctional facilities, and adding “hundreds” of shelter spaces in Edmonton. Major infrastructure investments include upgrades to Yellowhead Trail, Terwillegar Drive, Ray Gibbon Drive, and LRT projects, along with funding for MacEwan University. In a release, Alberta Municipalities said it is “extremely discouraged” by the proposed budget, noting money allocated to municipalities through the Local Government Fiscal Framework is “far short of what is needed” to address infrastructure needs.
  • Alberta Municipalities president Tyler Gandam spoke with Shaye Ganam at 630 CHED about whether Alberta will see political parties attached to municipal election candidates. A recent survey conducted for Alberta Municipalities found that 68% of Albertans oppose the introduction of partisan politics in local government and school board elections. “While political parties serve a purpose at the national and provincial levels due to differences in regional needs, they are unnecessary at the community level,” Gandam wrote in an op-ed.
  • Edmonton’s commercial real estate market is expected to improve in 2024, thanks in part to industrial growth and reduced office space vacancy. Mid-sized investment deals are also expected to drive recovery, according to CBRE. Building owners will need to ensure they have the right amenities to attract and retain tenants, said CBRE’s Dave Young, adding he has “renewed optimism in the province.”
  • The City of Edmonton‘s chief corporate economist, Felicia Mutheardy, is predicting stable economic growth for the city in 2023-24, with GDP levels expected to return to pre-pandemic figures. Despite the optimism, Mutheardy said there are concerns about how a rapidly increasing population could impact affordability in Edmonton. While she characterized the city’s labour market in 2023 as “resilient,” employment growth is expected to slow in 2024 because of high inflation and interest rates.
  • The Edmonton International Airport is pursuing hydrogen innovation not only for its own energy needs but also as a way to support innovation, economic growth, and sustainability across sectors, said CEO Myron Keehn. “I see an incredible opportunity to leverage our position and make substantial contributions to this transformative global shift,” he told Disruption Magazine.

Posts and Publications

Beyond Edmonton

  • The Edmonton Metropolitan Regional Board completed the region’s first climate risk and vulnerability assessment. The report provides 24 actions to guide climate resilience. “According to the report, the region could lose $4 billion annually by the 2050s if no action is taken,” the board said. “Understanding the most serious climate risks and knowing the pathways to resilience will help ensure the region remains a reliable and safe place to live and invest.”

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
February 2024

BOMA Edmonton

Mentions

Posts and Publications

Beyond Edmonton

BOMA Edmonton Spotlight:
January 2024

BOMA Edmonton

  • BOMA Edmonton president Lisa Baroldi spoke with Taproot Edmonton about plans to fill some vacant office towers with vertical farms. “I think that building owners should have the freedom to transform their buildings into whatever they see fit and that incentives ought to be in place and support in place for the types of conversions that address (downtown vibrancy and food security),” Baroldi said.

Mentions

Posts and Publications

  • BOMA Edmonton president Lisa Baroldi spoke with Taproot Edmonton about plans to fill some vacant office towers with vertical farms. “I think that building owners should have the freedom to transform their buildings into whatever they see fit and that incentives ought to be in place and support in place for the types of conversions that address (downtown vibrancy and food security),” Baroldi said.

Mentions

  • BOMA Edmonton president Lisa Baroldi spoke with Taproot Edmonton about plans to fill some vacant office towers with vertical farms. “I think that building owners should have the freedom to transform their buildings into whatever they see fit and that incentives ought to be in place and support in place for the types of conversions that address (downtown vibrancy and food security),” Baroldi said.